News for March 2016

February 2016
April 2016

Macedo Named Fulbright Scholar and ISEE Fellow
March 25, 2016

In February, Professor Jose Macedo, chair of the Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering Department, was selected as a Fulbright Scholar. It is the third time he has received the award.


Koch Honored with Outstanding Staff Award
March 18, 2016

Martin Koch, a distinguished lecturer and technical expert for the Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering (IME) Department, was recognized with a College of Engineering Outstanding Staff award presented at a college-wide meeting held Dec. 8, 2015.


Cal Poly Wins 'Top Marching Band' Award at Chinese New Year Parade — for Third Year Running
March 08, 2016

The Cal Poly Mustang Band took first place in the adult marching band category for the third consecutive year at the Southwest Airlines Chinese New Year Parade held Feb. 20 in San Francisco.

Nearly half of the band’s 210 musicians are engineering majors.

The parade, named one of the top 10 parades in the world by the International Festivals and Events Association, celebrated the Year of the Monkey with floats, lion dancers and other festive entries.

“I think for the students, it’s impressive to perform along a parade route lined by 1.2 million people — a mass of humanity that spans so many generations and nationalities,” said Christopher Woodruff, associate director of bands. “There was also a live television broadcast, which I understand was shared on an international feed. As participants in this celebration of the lunar new year, the students got to see and, indeed, be a part of some amazingly colorful and vibrant traditions.”

This was the third year the band had been invited to perform at the event, which was started in the 1860s by San Francisco’s Chinese community to educate and share their culture with the greater community. The parade and festival have since grown into the largest celebration of Asian culture outside of Asia.

The magnitude of the event’s size and its cultural dimensions required a stepped-up commitment from the band on a number of fronts, said Woodruff.

In addition to the Cal Poly fight song, “Yea, Poly!” and Stevie Wonder’s “Superstition,” which are among the band’s standard repertoire on campus, there was a custom arrangement of “Over Mountains and Valleys,” which is the theme song from a popular Chinese-language martial arts drama.

“For each of these tunes, the choreography for our color guard and feature twirlers, who are at the fore to ‘introduce’ the band, was designed to create the maximum visual impact on the audience,” said Woodruff.

The 1.5-mile parade route — with some band members carrying instruments, such as tubas and tenor drums, that weigh up to 50 pounds — required dedicated physical training as well.

“The Mustang Band is widely recognized for its extraordinarily spirited marching performance, whether parading along the street or into the gym for basketball games,” said Woodruff. “But it’s one thing to do what they do for the short distance down to the stadium, and quite another to sustain that level of active marching or dancing for a fully 90 minutes!”

The Mustang Band performs for nearly 50 occasions on campus each year, including athletic events and university functions.

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Pictured: Mechanical engineering majors Daniel Garcia, above, and Sarah Wattenberg, left (front row, far right).

Photo credit: John Osuno


Three Industrial Engineering Students in 'Top Band' at Chinese New Year Parade
March 08, 2016

Three industrial engineering students were part of the Cal Poly Mustang Band's award-winning performance at the Southwest Airlines Chinese New Year Parade held Feb. 20 in San Francisco. The band took first place in the adult marching band category for the third consecutive year.

Melisa Esquivias, Caroline Hodes and Zach Sniffin are in the trumpet, flute and percussion sections of the band, respectively, and they're not alone — engineering majors make up nearly half of the 210-member Mustang Band.

The parade, named one of the top 10 parades in the world by the International Festivals and Events Association, celebrated the Year of the Monkey with floats, lion dancers and other festive entries.

“I think for the students, it’s impressive to perform along a parade route lined by 1.2 million people — a mass of humanity that spans so many generations and nationalities,” said Christopher Woodruff, associate director of bands. “There was also a live television broadcast, which I understand was shared on an international feed. As participants in this celebration of the lunar new year, the students got to see and, indeed, be a part of some amazingly colorful and vibrant traditions.”

This was the third year the band had been invited to perform at the event, which was started in the 1860s by San Francisco’s Chinese community to educate and share their culture with the greater community. The parade and festival have since grown into the largest celebration of Asian culture outside of Asia.

The magnitude of the event’s size and its cultural dimensions required a stepped-up commitment from the band on a number of fronts, said Woodruff.

In addition to the Cal Poly fight song, “Yea, Poly!” and Stevie Wonder’s “Superstition,” which are among the band’s standard repertoire on campus, there was a custom arrangement of “Over Mountains and Valleys,” which is the theme song from a popular Chinese-language martial arts drama.

“For each of these tunes, the choreography for our color guard and feature twirlers, who are at the fore to ‘introduce’ the band, was designed to create the maximum visual impact on the audience,” said Woodruff.

The 1.5-mile parade route — with some band members carrying instruments, such as tubas and tenor drums, that weigh up to 50 pounds — required dedicated physical training as well.

“The Mustang Band is widely recognized for its extraordinarily spirited marching performance, whether parading along the street or into the gym for basketball games,” said Woodruff. “But it’s one thing to do what they do for the short distance down to the stadium, and quite another to sustain that level of active marching or dancing for a fully 90 minutes!”

The Mustang Band performs for nearly 50 occasions on campus each year, including athletic events and university functions.

###

Pictured: Mechanical engineering majors Daniel Garcia, above, and Sarah Wattenberg, left (front row, far right).

Photo credit: John Osuno


Cal Poly Engineering Dean Speaks at State Capitol during California Aerospace Days
March 01, 2016

During California Aerospace Days, Cal Poly College of Engineering dean, Debra Larson, spoke before a joint session of California lawmakers on “Women in Aerospace and Engineering.” The annual event was held Feb. 29 through March 1 in Sacramento, Calif.

Larson was among a select number of industry, government and education leaders asked to testify before the Assembly Select Committee on Aerospace and the Senate Select Committee on Defense and Aerospace.

A key focus of Larson’s address envisioned California achieving 30 percent gender diversity on its university campuses within five years.

“Women engineers currently comprise 14.6 percent of the aerospace and defense industry workforces,” said Larson. “Reaching 30 percent gender diversity in our colleges of engineering and computer science in five years is definitely possible — Cal Poly is on target to reach an incoming first-time freshman class of 30 percent women in fall 2016,” she said.

The 30 percent figure draws from the physics concept of the amount of mass needed to sustain a nuclear reaction — and that same percentage has figured prominently in other breakthroughs as well: “It famously found its way into Justice O’Connor’s opinion in Grutter v. Bollinger on the University of Michigan’s Law School admission policy,” noted Larson.

“Critical mass is the number that encourages underrepresented students to participate in the classroom and not feel isolated — it’s the number when stereotypes lose their force,” Larson continued. “When one out of every three engineers and computer scientists is a woman, the culture will change because of the magnitude of their collective impact. They will see the critical mass that creates the cultural chain reaction from the inside.”

Cultural diversity makes for a thriving state and global economy, she said. “The marketplace of technology-oriented industries is defined by complexity, disruption and change. Today’s most successful enterprises are those that bring diverse experiences and perspectives to each new challenge.”

The hearing, held Feb. 29, was focused on women’s experiences in the engineering field and the programs that have helped them succeed in the fields of aerospace and STEM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics and aerospace).

In addition to Larson, others addressing the joint session on the challenges and opportunities for women in STEM fields included Kelly Jill Hennig, Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems; Malina Hills, The Aerospace Corporation; Tamara Jernigan, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Kelly Latimer, Virgin Galactic; Sandra Magnus, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics; Madeline Salazar, Boeing Satellite Systems; and Julie Van Kleeck, Aerojet Rocketdyne.

Video link: https://digitaldemocracy.org/hearing/830?startTime=29&vid=mBEczR4EQug

 

 

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February 2016
April 2016